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“If I don’t steal your home, someone else will steal it,” says Israeli settler to Palestinian resident of Sheikh Jarrah

In a video circulated on social media, an Israeli settler appeared while telling Mona al-Kurd, a young Palestinian woman whose home was stolen by the settler in the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood in the occupied East Jerusalem, if he don’t steal her home, someone else will steal it.

The video shows the 22-year-old al-Kurd confronting the settler in the garden of her family home.

“Jacob, you know that this is not your home,” Mona told the settler in English.

“Yes, but if I go, you don’t go back, so what’s the problem? Why are you yelling at me?” was the answer of the settler.

“You are stealing my house!” Mona replied.

“If I don’t steal it, someone else will steal it,” Jacob answers. “So why are you yelling at me?”

“No one is allowed to steal my home!” Mona shouted.

The settler’s answer was in Hebrew, “This is not mine in order to return it.”

The Israeli District Court in Jerusalem today decided to hold another session on May 10 to discuss the evictions of Palestinian families from their homes in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood.

The Palestinian families from the Sheikh Jarrah told the Supreme Israeli Court today that no compromise has been reached with Israeli settlers concerning land and house ownership claims by the latter.

Sami Irsheid, the lawyer of Sheikh Jarrah families, said he had submitted to the court a notification that no agreement was made with the settlers concerning their alleged ownership claims, and said the families were waiting for the court’s ruling concerning the matter at any time today or later on.

Dozens of Palestinians are facing imminent eviction from their homes in the Sheikh Jarrah, in a move to force them out and replace it entirely with an Israeli settlement.

The court ruled at least six families must vacate their homes in Sheikh Jarrah on Sunday, despite living there for generations, to make way for a new Israeli settlement known as Shimon HaTsadiq.

However, the Court on Sunday gave the Palestinian families until Thursday to reach a deal with Israeli settlers regarding the ownership of their homes.

The deal proposed by the court requires the Palestinian families to pay the Israeli settlers to rent their homes until the current owners pass away and then assign the properties to the settlers, not to their heirs.

The families refused this proposal, considering it a recognition of the claimed demands of the settlers.

In February, the Court also rejected an appeal by four Palestinian families living in Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood against their eviction from their homes. The court upheld the eviction order, and it gave the four families until May 2 to implement the eviction decision.

The same court ruled seven other families should leave their homes by August 1.

A plan for the settlement, consisting of 200 housing units on 18 dunums, has already been submitted to the Israeli municipality in Jerusalem.

In total, 58 people, including 17 children, are set to be forcibly displaced to make way for Israeli settlers.

In 1972, several Israeli settler organisations filed a lawsuit against the Palestinian families living in Sheikh Jarrah, alleging the land originally belonged to Jews.

These groups, mostly funded by donors from the United States, have waged a relentless battle that resulted in the displacement of 43 Palestinians in 2002, as well as the Hanoun and Ghawi families in 2008 and the Shamasneh family in 2017.

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